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Best coffee grinder – CNET


An ideal coffee grinder produces ground particles that are of a consistent and correct size. By that, we mean that the size of ground coffee particles should match its grinder’s coarseness setting, fine or not. The size of grounds produced should also be fit for the intended brewing method, as outlined within the product manual.

To test each grinder for our coffee grinder reviews, we first hand-wash and dry all parts recommended by the manufacturer. We then set each machine to the appropriate level for grinding drip coffee or automatic coffee brewers (again, as indicated by the manual). Sometimes the manual lacks specific directions. In this case, we select the middle coarse setting for grinding coffee, then bump it up by one more coarse level (from fine grind, such as an espresso grind, to coarse grind). For example, if a grinder has 16 total coarse grind settings (assuming 16 is its most coarse grinding option and 1 is fine), we’ll set it for coarse level 9.

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Watch this: Five things to know before buying a coffee grinder

Next we weigh out 10 grams of whole coffee beans to grind. By default our test beans are Kirkland Colombian roast. It’s the same beans we use for our coffee maker tests. (No judgments, please.) When you grind as much coffee and espresso as we do, it pays to be frugal.

Then we run our sample beans through the grinder. We also make note of how long the grinder takes to grind coffee beans. Next, we carefully collect the grounds, then sift them with a two-screen sieve for 60 seconds. For that we use the Kruve Sifter system. Our original Kruve Two unit came with two mesh screens of different aperture sizes (800 and 400 microns). This step lets us measure the grind size and grind consistency of our sample. The Kruve Base has now replaced the Kruve Two, and offers five mesh screens (300, 500, 800, 1,100, and 1,400 microns).

We used a Kruve coffee sieve system to confirm grind size consistency. 

Brian Bennett/CNET

A superior electric coffee grinder or hand grinder will produce grounds, preferably with stainless steel blades, that are mostly between 400 and 800 microns in particle size (at our chosen grind settings). Finally, we weigh the grounds that collect between the two screens (800 microns top, 400 microns bottom).

A bad grinder will grind particles of varying sizes, from large to small. Blade grinders are notorious for this issue. Unlike a blade coffee grinder, a coffee grinder with steel or ceramic burrs typically yields grounds that are much more uniform in grind size.

Oxo’s coffee grinder weighs grounds for extra precision

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Additionally, we grind at least two more times. From there, we can record an average optimal yield for each grinder.

Want more? Whether you’re a coffee lover who prefers a simple cup of fresh coffee, espresso or even Turkish coffee, here’s a list of coffee grinders I’ve put through their paces for this evaluation, in addition to the ones above. And below that, you’ll find a chart that displays their grinding pros and cons and how well they stack up against each other. Now enjoy a cup!

Coffee grinders compared

Baratza Encore Bodum Bistro coffee grinder Breville Smart Grinder Pro Capresso Infinity Conical Burr grinder Cuisinart Supreme Grind Automatic Burr Mill Krups GX5000 Mr. Coffee Electric 12-cup coffee grinder Oxo Brew Conical Burr coffee grinder
Average optimal yield (grams) 2.6 3.9 6.5 2.9 1.8 1.9 1.8 3.2
Percent optimal yield 26.3% 38.7% 64.7% 28.7% 18% 19% 18.3% 32.3%
Average grind time (seconds) 26 9 10 10 33 19 12 7
Price $170 $100 $200 $100 $60 $93 $23 $100



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